Tag Archives: activism

A Conference Report Faggots and Class Struggle 1976

A Conference Report Faggots and Class Struggle (click on the title to download).

This is a copy of Morning Due V.2, Issue 6, which was produced by attended a gathering at Magdalen Farm, which is now Wolf Creek Sanctuary.

At the end of this interview, someone reflects on the gathering.

And here is a where you can purchase recorded exerts from the conference.

I plan on writing more about this, but I wanted to post this as soon as I could.

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George Mason University’s Cultural Studies Conference CFP

Ecological Inequalities and Interventions: Contemporary Environmental Practices

The Cultural Studies Student Organizing Committee (SOC) of George Mason University invites paper proposals for our 5th annual Cultural Studies Graduate Student Conference. The Conference will take place on Friday, September 23, 2011 at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

Call for Papers

“Since most of history’s giant trees have already been cut down, a new Ark will have to be constructed out of the materials that a desperate humanity finds at hand in insurgent communities, pirate technologies, bootlegged media, rebel science and forgotten utopias.”
(Mike Davis, “Who Will Build the Ark?”, New Left Review, January 2010)

The current and future impacts of ongoing, globalized environmental crises have animated scholars, activists, and professionals from a wide variety of disciplines and backgrounds and generated a burgeoning field of work that seeks to come to grips with the ecologies of the present as well as the possible ecologies of the future. This conference will provide a forum for emerging scholars and practitioners involved in cultural studies, environmental studies, the arts and humanities, public policy, political ecology and related fields to engage in conversations regarding contemporary and prospective environmental practices and politics.

We seek to engage in efforts to develop a deeper understanding of human interventions – in the forms of work, art, and politics – into the environment. We also wish to examine the ways in which concepts such as “nature” and “human practice” inform, articulate with and determine one another.  “Ecological Inequalities and Interventions: Contemporary Environmental Practices” will offer an appropriately interdisciplinary forum for work in this emerging area of inquiry.

Possible paper topics include:

·      Environmental activism: past, present, and future

·      Labor, Nature and Culture

·      Marxism and Ecology

·      Ecology as critique and self-critique

·      Creative expression and Ecology

·      Neoliberalism and Discourses of Sustainability

·      Ecology and the Politics of the Global South

·      Environmentalism and Citizenship

·      Green economies

·      Academic interventions and public policy

We welcome proposals for traditional academic paper presentations, as well as alternative formats such as panel discussions, workshops, and film screenings. In addition we hope to publish select conference papers in an edited volume or curated journal issue.

Abstracts of 300 words and a current CV should be sent to Jason Morris (jmorrisf AT masonlive DOT gmu DOT edu) by 15 May 2011. Please include the title, presenter’s name, institutional affiliation, contact information, A/V requests and any other special needs required. Abstracts should be sent as .doc, .rtf or PDF file attachments.

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A Psychoanalytic Approach to Community Justice

This just got accepted to this conference Reinstating Transgression. A rough draft of the paper should be up on this site soon.

Using Helplessness to Reimagine the LGBT Community: A Psychoanalytic Approach to Community Justice


It appears to be an exciting time for gay and lesbian citizens in the United States of America; the blockades to same-sex marriage and openly gay military service are being questioned within the mainstream political sphere. To sustain and build upon this momentum, Equality Across America (EAA) organized the March for Equality in Washington, DC, which generated interest in building EAA chapters across the nation. The organization’s mission is to gain “equal protection in all matters governed by civil law in all 50 states.” The vague and inclusive mission statement does not reflect the organization’s focused and exclusionary politics, which reinforce dominant socio-economic hierarchies. In this essay, I examine their events, speeches, and promotional material to highlight a growing trend within the US LGBT political movement of narrowing primary objectives and rejecting issues and people connoting helplessness. National LGBT organizations routinely ignore HIV and AIDS, violence against youth and transgender people, racism, labor issues, and various people deemed “stereotypical” and instead focus on access to marriage benefits and military service. This realignment, as demonstrated by the EAA, creates the illusion of a self-reliant, simple, and strong community that can sustain itself; this image has symbolic capital within the national imaginary. By focusing on two of the most conservative and blindly nationalistic issues within the spectrum of LGBT issues, activists avoid controversy. Lack of controversy gives the newly fabricated gay and lesbian movement mass appeal, allowing corporate sponsors and upper to upper-middle class LGBT people and allies to donate without hesitation or fear of systemic changes, instead only slight reform occurs. This idealized and helpless-free version of LGBT life hides the pain and systemic injustices done to community members; injustices that could be addressed within the public sphere and used to build alliances, if the national organization recognized helplessness within the community. This fear and rejection of helplessness is a systemic issue within US culture and causes citizens to allow the government access to and outright control over an increasing larger segment of public and private concerns. I use the work of psychoanalysts D.W. Winnicott, Melanie Klein, and Adam Phillips to intervene in EAA’s paradigm of community and grassroots movement building and demonstrate helplessness as an innate feature of humanity that has significant potential within the political and in reshaping a more accurate sense of self, community, and democracy.

Any suggestions?

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